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The Australian Woodturning Exhibition 2014

The Australian Woodturning Exhibition was run on the 13th to 15th of June 2014 at the Waratah room of the Nunawading Civic Centre.

There were a large number of entries across all four sections, from all Eastern States with an excellent range of exhibits within each category.

The best of show was awarded to the Emperors Carriage (pictured).

Ken Wraight

Ken Wraight

 

In the Open section featured items ranging in size from the miniatures (fitting into a 50mm cube) to those of a replica of the Eiffel tower approx. 900mm high.

Paul Barton

Paul Barton

 

There was a variety and innovation in the use of materials, accentuating the timbers properties be it structure or strength.

Cliff Walsh

Cliff Walsh

 

Stephen Hughes

Stephen Hughes

The Intermediate section entrants had particular emphasis on embellishment of their items via carving, and the extensive use of Desert timbers especially the acacias.

Donal Kelman

Donal Kelman

 

The Novice section continues to impress with the standard reached especially with the degree of difficulty in the exhibits presented, the number and range of designs especially in the Clocks is to be highly commended.

Vince Rush

Vince Rush

 

One of our winning students from 2013 excelled in the novice lidded container section by picking up a first.  This makes all our efforts well worth it as one of the primary intentions of this exhibition is to nurture our future turners.

Ian Sinclair

Ian Sinclair

 

The students increased in number and produced some excellent work some very thin work and some excellent joinery before the high quality turning.

Claire Schader-Brown

Claire Schader-Brown

 

Many thanks to the competitors and the numerous sponsors.

 This years show will be run 5-7th June, 2015 again being held at the Nunawading Civic Centre.  We are pleased to announce the introduction of a new category – Ornamental or Complex Turning.  Ornamental turning differs from traditional or plain turning insofar as it primarily involves the decoration or surface embellishment of objects that may first have been turned by traditional means.  One of the key differences between plain and ornamental turning is that in the latter the tool rotates instead of the work.  In ornamental turning tools may be profiled in a variety of ways, and move in any direction while cutting.  Although the work itself remains stationary in most cases, sometimes both the tool and the work may move in a synchronized fashion.  The variety of decorations and surface shapes that result is infinite so the skill of the ornamental turner in part lies in the ability to produce designs which are artistic and consistent with the object being embellished.

Sol Dasika

Sol Dasika

The embellishment normally consists of a series of cuts, incisions or holes made at regular intervals around the work.  The cuts are all mechanically controlled using an ornamental lathe, a Rose Engine lathe or CNC lathe.  The cuts or incisions must remain as they leave the tool as any attempt to improve their finish will detract from the crispness of the cuts.  For this reason the wood typically used in ornamental turning tends to be the hardest wood such as African blackwood, boxwood or gidgee. It should be noted that works which have been created featuring freehand texturing which is commonly undertaken using hand tools such as the Robert Sorby Spiralling & Texturing tool or a Dremel are not classified as ornamental turning for the purpose of The Australian Woodturning Exhibition.

Ornamental turning was particularly popular during the Victorian era. Although its popularity fell during the early part of the 20th century there has been renewed interest in this ancient craft in recent times. The following images illustrate the nature of Ornamental Turning as practiced by Bill Ooms of Prescott, Arizona who has kindly given permission to reproduce his photographs.

In Photo 1, Black Egg – which uses African Blackwood, Maple and Bloodwood the interior of the egg has a thin layer of Maple covered with a thin layer of Bloodwood. The thin layers were pierced through with the ornamental lathe to create a delicate pattern within.

Black Egg

Photo 1 – Black Egg

 

 Photo 2. – Swallow’s Nest Castle uses African Blackwood & Red Mallee Burl this small castle was modelled after the main tower on the Swallow’s Nest Castle in Crimea. It was constructed from 14 separate pieces. The main portions have threaded joints allowing the entire piece to be dis-assembled.

Photo 2 - Swallow's Nest Castle

Photo 2 – Swallow’s Nest Castle

Finally, in Photo 3 – Goblets – Bill has used: Pink Ivory & African Blackwood, Boxwood & African Blackwood and Cocobolo & Holly to produce a series of goblets made from different woods. The stems have a spiral pattern that pierces through an outer layer of wood to reveal a different coloured wood on the inner core.

Photo 3 - Goblets

Photo 3 – Goblets

 

Photographs kindly reproduced by permission; Bill Ooms 2014

Thanks to our contributor Peter Oppenheim for providing the information and write up on the Ornamental Turning.
All exhibition photos courtesy of Eastern Suburbs Photographic Society.

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