Posts by AWTEX

A Day in the Shed

A Day in the Shed

Written by: Barry Mock

As a novice class prize winner in the Australian Wood Turning Exhibition I was honoured to be offered a “ day in the shed” by Don Kelman. I gratefully accepted and a day was arranged for Sunday the 18th of October.

Piece by Barry Mock. AWTEX 2015 Winner third place – Novice Bowl Over 200mm

Piece by Barry Mock. AWTEX 2015 Winner third place – Novice Bowl Over 200mm

 

Prior to the day Don asked what would I like to know more about. What a question, as novice, like everything ! However, I eventually nominated deep hollowing being a technique I new nothing about, even the trivial stuff like how do you sand the inside when your fingers won’t reach the bottom, let alone how to get the wood out in the first place.

Piece by Donal Kelman. AWTEX 2015 Winner first place – Intermediate Lidded Container

Piece by Donal Kelman. AWTEX 2015 Winner first place – Intermediate Lidded Container

 

The day arrived and I was met by Don and Soren around 9:00 am in Don’s functional, well equipped workshop, even if it may have been lacking a little in glitz and glamour. It was immediately down to work. Don set me up on lathe with a very nice piece of Iron Bark and wanted a slightly flared vessel turned with a mouth about 9 cm diameter and a depth of around 20 cm and then floored me requesting the walls be of uniform thickness right to the bottom of no more than 3 mm thickness. I resisted the urge to laugh and immediately leave and we got down to work.

Easy Wood Tools TC Tipped Hollowing Tool

Easy Wood Tools TC Tipped Hollowing Tool

Easy Wood Tools TC Tipped Hollowing Tool

Easy Wood Tools TC Tipped Hollowing Tool

 

 

 

 

 

 

Easy Wood Tools TC Tipped Hollowing Tool

Easy Wood
Tipped Hollowing Tool
The Easy Hollower was designed to offer a revolutionary new approach to turning hollow forms. These patended tools allow any skill level to achieve professional results for hollowing work with minimum effort and worry.

 

For the next 5 hours or so, with a very nice lunch thrown in, I was mentored on the techniques of progressive hollowing using a variety of tools as the depth increased.

Woodcut Pro-Master

Woodcut Pro-Mast

Woodcut Pro-Master

Woodcut Pro-Master

 

 

 

 

 

 

Woodcut Pro-Master Hollowing Tool Rigidity is a must when hollowing, for vessels deeper then 10" (250mm) slide the 5/8" shaft back up into the handle, the 1-1/8" handle now becomes the shaft, you can then add additional Promaster handles as you go deeper to suit your particular application.

Woodcut Pro-Master
Hollowing Tool
Rigidity is a must when hollowing, for vessels deeper then 10″ (250mm) slide the 5/8″ shaft back up into the handle, the 1-1/8″ handle now becomes the shaft, you can then add additional Promaster handles as you go deeper to suit your particular application.

 

Some of the hardware was impressive, allowing continued control as the unsupported length of tool beyond the tool rest increased at greater depths.

Robert Sorby Deep Hollowing System The RS2000 System is a method of deep vessel hollowing. This flexible system can be used in a number of modes. It is a very safe and effective means of hollowing deep vessels through narrow openings. And it can be used for coning - producing a series of bowls from the same blank with a minimum of waste wood.

Robert Sorby
Deep Hollowing System
The RS2000 System is a method of deep vessel hollowing. This flexible system can be used in a number of modes. It is a very safe and effective means of hollowing deep vessels through narrow openings. And it can be used for coning – producing a series of bowls from the same blank with a minimum of waste wood.

Robert Sorby Deep Hollowing Tool

Robert Sorby Deep Hollowing Tool

Robert Sorby Deep Hollowing Tool

Robert Sorby Deep Hollowing Tool

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As the fear factor decreased, I realised that with mentoring on technique and a knowledge of and access to the tools required, even a relative beginner like myself could achieve pleasing results and the confidence to attempt something even more demanding in the future. I now even know how to sand the inside of a vessel your fingers won’t reach the bottom of.

Vermec Deep Hollowing Gate System

Vermec Deep Hollowing Gate System

Vermec Deep Hollowing Gate System

Vermec Deep Hollowing Gate System

 

 

 

 

 

Vermec Deep Hollowing System This versitile new tool is made from stainless steel. The removable handle has an easy grip rubber finish and is loaded with lead shot which takes the shocks and gives good balance. The handle is bored to take a 12mm round shaft so that it can be used with any tool with the same size shaft.

Vermec
Deep Hollowing System
This versitile new tool is made from stainless steel. The removable handle has an easy grip rubber finish and is loaded with lead shot which takes the shocks and gives good balance. The handle is bored to take a 12mm round shaft so that it can be used with any tool with the same size shaft.

 

I enjoyed the day immensely and thank Don and Soren for so generously giving their time and freely passing on their hard learned knowledge.

Hamlet Bowl Gouge (Ellsworth Grind)

Hamlet Bowl Gouge (Ellsworth Grind)

Hamlet Bowl Gouge Ellsworth Grind Bowl Gouge for heavy profile cuts or delicate feather cuts. Ellsworth Grind: This deep fluted bowl gouge is made to David Ellsworth specifications sharpened with side grind, offering exceptional versatility in bowl turning. Powerful roughing cuts to delicate shearing cuts, make this tool a favorite for turning bowls.

Hamlet Bowl Gouge
Ellsworth Grind
Bowl Gouge for heavy profile cuts or delicate feather cuts. Ellsworth Grind: This deep fluted bowl gouge is made to David Ellsworth specifications sharpened with side grind, offering exceptional versatility in bowl turning. Powerful roughing cuts to delicate shearing cuts, make this tool a favorite for turning bowls.

 

I now also have a very nice Iron Bark vessel as a memento of the day and a reminder that any one can do it if you get the right help. That is the benefit of belonging to a club like the Eastern Wood Turners, our club.

 

Barry Mock-Iron Bark Vessel

Barry Mock-Iron Bark Vessel

 

 

All tools used above can be purchased from our sponsors. Please find sponsors on our Sponsors page and follow the links to order on line or visit their shop. Follow our sponsors news on our Sponsors News page. 

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Major Prize Winners 2015 Exhibition

Major Prize Winners 2015 Exhibition

 

Major Prize Winners 2015 Exhibition

Well The 2015 Australian Woodturning Exhibition, which ran from 5-7th June at the Waratah Rooms, Whitehorse Centre in Nunawading, is over. And what a show. Our exhibitors excelled themselves this year and the buzz around the exhibition hall was that this has truly become an art show – creativity abounded!!! We had the most exhibits, the most visitors and the most sales. What a tribute to the exhibitors and to Ray Dennis, our outgoing Chairman.

JimMcC1

Jim McChonnachie

 

The best of show was deservedly won by Jim McChonnachie, from Queensland, who produced an amazing laminated/built up. The precision and workmanship was out of this world and created much interest and desire to know just how he managed to create such perfection.

John McIndoe

Alan McIndoe

 

The lidded container that won the Peter Robson Award, was a stunning turned and carved container, which had an oriental feel.   Alan McIndoe, certainly excelled himself here.

"an abstract representation of Waltzing Matilda"

Robert Chaplin

Robert Chaplin from Queensland, who previously lived in New Zealand  and with his vast knowledge of the wood of both countries, won the Best Intermediate with a Novelty Item “an abstract representation of Waltzing Matilda”. The delicacy of his work is absolutely tremendous.

Hugh McKay

Hugh McKay

The Best Novice was won by Hugh MacKay, with an outstanding bowl that was reminiscent of the art nouveau era with sweeping curves and lines. Just magical.

The Acacia Awards were won by:

Tim Huston

Tim Hutson

Tim Hutson, with a spindle turned item “Wine Goblet” in the Novice section,

Allen Way

Allen Way

Allan Way with a skirted bowl up to 200mm in the Intermediate Section and

Stephen Hughes

Stephen Hughes

Stephen Hughes with a really sleek vase in the Open Section.

Ian Brown

Ian Brown

Ian Brown won the Best Eucalypt Award in the Novice for two items, which both received the same awards for an Item with a Natural Edge.

Donal Kelman

Donal Kelman

An outstanding miniature by Donal Kelman won the Intermediate Prize and

Dennis Donnelly

Dennis Donnelly

the Best Eucalypt in the Open Section went to Dennis Donnelly.

The Students this year provided some outstanding pieces.  Under the tutorage of Stephen Hughes at the Hailebury School, we would expect nothing else!!

Annabelle Arm

Annabelle Armstrong

The first prize was won by Annabelle Armstrong with paper thin hollowed out ball, which opened. This item generated a lot of interest and no one could believe it had been produced by a student. Well done Annabelle. In fact, well done all the students. We hope that this is the beginning of a long life career/hobby in woodturning. You all certainly have the talent to become master turners!!

At the same time as the opening of the show we launched our new website www.awtex.com.au. This has been well received both here and across the world. Our associated social media has been a real hit with well over 1000 hits in 3 days. We hope this new website will become a reference tool for all wood turners with feature articles, blogs, links to clubs around the country and Facebook messages, tweets and photos on Instagram and Pinterest. We would encourage all turners to submit articles for publication.

The quality of work for 2015 was outstanding; the creativity raised the bar for all turners. So what next??? Well just watch this space to see what will be created for 2016.

Professional Photography courtesy of  Eastern Suburbs Photographic Society

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The Australian Woodturning Exhibition 2014

The Australian Woodturning Exhibition was run on the 13th to 15th of June 2014 at the Waratah room of the Nunawading Civic Centre.

There were a large number of entries across all four sections, from all Eastern States with an excellent range of exhibits within each category.

The best of show was awarded to the Emperors Carriage (pictured).

Ken Wraight

Ken Wraight

 

In the Open section featured items ranging in size from the miniatures (fitting into a 50mm cube) to those of a replica of the Eiffel tower approx. 900mm high.

Paul Barton

Paul Barton

 

There was a variety and innovation in the use of materials, accentuating the timbers properties be it structure or strength.

Cliff Walsh

Cliff Walsh

 

Stephen Hughes

Stephen Hughes

The Intermediate section entrants had particular emphasis on embellishment of their items via carving, and the extensive use of Desert timbers especially the acacias.

Donal Kelman

Donal Kelman

 

The Novice section continues to impress with the standard reached especially with the degree of difficulty in the exhibits presented, the number and range of designs especially in the Clocks is to be highly commended.

Vince Rush

Vince Rush

 

One of our winning students from 2013 excelled in the novice lidded container section by picking up a first.  This makes all our efforts well worth it as one of the primary intentions of this exhibition is to nurture our future turners.

Ian Sinclair

Ian Sinclair

 

The students increased in number and produced some excellent work some very thin work and some excellent joinery before the high quality turning.

Claire Schader-Brown

Claire Schader-Brown

 

Many thanks to the competitors and the numerous sponsors.

 This years show will be run 5-7th June, 2015 again being held at the Nunawading Civic Centre.  We are pleased to announce the introduction of a new category – Ornamental or Complex Turning.  Ornamental turning differs from traditional or plain turning insofar as it primarily involves the decoration or surface embellishment of objects that may first have been turned by traditional means.  One of the key differences between plain and ornamental turning is that in the latter the tool rotates instead of the work.  In ornamental turning tools may be profiled in a variety of ways, and move in any direction while cutting.  Although the work itself remains stationary in most cases, sometimes both the tool and the work may move in a synchronized fashion.  The variety of decorations and surface shapes that result is infinite so the skill of the ornamental turner in part lies in the ability to produce designs which are artistic and consistent with the object being embellished.

Sol Dasika

Sol Dasika

The embellishment normally consists of a series of cuts, incisions or holes made at regular intervals around the work.  The cuts are all mechanically controlled using an ornamental lathe, a Rose Engine lathe or CNC lathe.  The cuts or incisions must remain as they leave the tool as any attempt to improve their finish will detract from the crispness of the cuts.  For this reason the wood typically used in ornamental turning tends to be the hardest wood such as African blackwood, boxwood or gidgee. It should be noted that works which have been created featuring freehand texturing which is commonly undertaken using hand tools such as the Robert Sorby Spiralling & Texturing tool or a Dremel are not classified as ornamental turning for the purpose of The Australian Woodturning Exhibition.

Ornamental turning was particularly popular during the Victorian era. Although its popularity fell during the early part of the 20th century there has been renewed interest in this ancient craft in recent times. The following images illustrate the nature of Ornamental Turning as practiced by Bill Ooms of Prescott, Arizona who has kindly given permission to reproduce his photographs.

In Photo 1, Black Egg – which uses African Blackwood, Maple and Bloodwood the interior of the egg has a thin layer of Maple covered with a thin layer of Bloodwood. The thin layers were pierced through with the ornamental lathe to create a delicate pattern within.

Black Egg

Photo 1 – Black Egg

 

 Photo 2. – Swallow’s Nest Castle uses African Blackwood & Red Mallee Burl this small castle was modelled after the main tower on the Swallow’s Nest Castle in Crimea. It was constructed from 14 separate pieces. The main portions have threaded joints allowing the entire piece to be dis-assembled.

Photo 2 - Swallow's Nest Castle

Photo 2 – Swallow’s Nest Castle

Finally, in Photo 3 – Goblets – Bill has used: Pink Ivory & African Blackwood, Boxwood & African Blackwood and Cocobolo & Holly to produce a series of goblets made from different woods. The stems have a spiral pattern that pierces through an outer layer of wood to reveal a different coloured wood on the inner core.

Photo 3 - Goblets

Photo 3 – Goblets

 

Photographs kindly reproduced by permission; Bill Ooms 2014

Thanks to our contributor Peter Oppenheim for providing the information and write up on the Ornamental Turning.
All exhibition photos courtesy of Eastern Suburbs Photographic Society.

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A Day Turning With Paul Barton

Donal Kelman organized to spend a day with Paul Barton in January and thought he would share his experience with fellow turners.

Donal Kelman at work

Donal Kelman at work

After a 2.5 hour drive, Donal arrived at Paul’s place at Point Lonsdale to be greeted with “come on let’s get in to it”.  I had taken down some of my different acacias and Paul selected a cracked piece of Mulga to make a vase.  To make things difficult he decided to turn the wood in its side grain.  Having watched Paul for a while so that I had a better understanding of how to go about this, I took over and did some of the turning myself.

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